Days Gone By

We live in an area that’s rich in history. A lot of pioneers settled in these hills in the 1800’s and Laura and Almanzo Wilder were among them. 

Yesterday we went to see Rocky Ridge, the home where Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote her Little House books. 

We’ve been there before a few times, but this year there is a new visitors center, gift shop, and museum, so that was quite a treat. 

There’s something comforting about being on their land. It’s kind of a cross between feeling completely “at home” at a grandmother’s house, mixed with the nostalgia of stories that seem to come to life while looking around the property. 

Just being there, I can picture the scenes from the Rose Years books. Can you imagine Abe and Swiney traipsing through the woods and Alva and Effie living back in those hills? 

Right now their yard is blanketed in yellow and white wildflowers and there is a dogwood tree blooming. Spring is so beautiful in the Ozarks. 

After our tours, we stopped at a park that’s across the street from a bank that opened in 1892. 

It’s pretty neat to stand under those oak trees and imagine the wagons and train whistles of long ago, during those days gone by. 

33 thoughts on “Days Gone By

    • That made me smile. What a great show.

      At the new museum, there is a section about the tv show and there is a giant picture of the whole family from the show. It’s so neat.

      They have reruns of the show on here during the day. Pretty neat to watch once in a while.

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  1. As I was reading this it occurred to me how much you enjoy history. You give a good deal of consideration to visualizing how things were in the past when writing about your surroundings. This is a unique perspective you bring to situations and one you might want to capitalize upon even more in your writing. Just a thought, Jessica.

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    • Yes, history is kind of my thing. I love how you noticed that. What you said, it means a lot to me, especially with your writing career. I figure you just call it like you see it and if you see it, it is worth some serious looking into.

      I didn’t write much in March, for a combo of reasons, but I feel kind of like I’m searching for my writing voice, if that makes any sense. Thank you so much for your insight. I am going to toss it around in my head and heart and see where it goes. I appreciate you!

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    • Have you been to any of her museums? You would TOTALLY love this one. Pa’s fiddle is here and so are the coins Laura and Mary got for Christmas when Santa Claus sent Mr. Edwards to deliver the presents. Laura’s lap desk that she used while traveling with Almanzo and Rose to Missouri is there, too. Sooooooo much wonderful stuff. Even presents Almanzo gave to Laura, like a book and a little porcelain jewelry box. Oh, and all of the calling cards Laura collected from her friends when she was a girl. The only thing I didn’t see that I hoped to was Ma’s little china keepsake that she moved from place to place and always put on Pa’s shelf. It’s really a cool place.

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  2. My husband owns all the DVD’s of every episode of Little House on The Prairie!
    I remember my home-schooling sister-in-law from MO telling me she took her kids to this same place to learn their history lesson. Love the photos!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I wish there was a LOVE button here instead of just a Like. Your husband is like my hero!!

      Isn’t that neat that your sister-in-law took her kids there???? I need to meet her! Next time you’re down, maybe I can meet you both!

      Thank you- it was such a dark day. Hard to get a good picture of a white house when the sky is gray. But, I figured if some of you guys haven’t been there, you’d like to “be there” along with me. I think most pictures of the white house are from the front. I love seeing the back door. Can you imagine how many times that screen door slammed shut over the years? Also, the chimney is really cool. One time when we were there we got to go upstairs in the white house. It is a rare occasion that they open it up, so that was neat.

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  3. My son and I read all the Little House books when he was very small and watched te tv series. My daughter read those same books when she was an adult and recently has been reading them with her youngest son. Every few years I watch the programmes again. My mum is 86 and loves watching the reruns. It’s not often you find books and tv programmes that appeal to all ages, sexes and generations in the same family. Thank you so much for these photos, I bet you can almost feel their presence ๐Ÿ˜Š๐ŸŒท

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    • Oh my goodness, that is a range of ages. I bet Miss Laura never would’ve guessed that her stories live in so many hearts. Yes ma’am, especially so since you can see things as she left them. The bed is made and you can see where that sat in front of the fireplace.

      At the stone house that Rose bought them from the Sears catalog, there are many windows and lots of built in shelves holding knick knacks. The room I love most in the stone house is the kitchen. It’s perfectly small and I can just imagine her making breakfast in there. Glad you enjoyed the pictures. I wish they allowed indoor pictures, but they don’t. ๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ˜Š

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  4. Ah, I came here after reading your next post, if you see what I mean. I guess I was spot on with the Little House on the Prairie then! Must be a fascinating place to visit.

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    • Oh my gosh, how cool is that? That you saw the other post first and thought it looked like it. LOVE THAT.

      It would be really easy to just say that it is a neat place and leave it at that, but if you like history, it’s more like walking into a legacy, if that makes any sense at all.

      Readers of all of her books sort of have a connection to her stories and life because she shared it with all of us. Some of the items she talks about in her books are there. Like you can really see them. A bit surreal. Stories come to life. :)

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